Your Daily Dose of Kick-Ass Women of Color

girl-bear:


shakeitupbebe:


citoyenrebelle:


I didn’t know her, therefore Wikipedia:


Lucy (or Lucia) Eldine Gonzalez was born around 1853 in Texas, likely as a slave, to parents of Native American, Black American and Mexican ancestry.[1] In 1871 she married Albert Parsons, a former Confederate soldier. They were forced to flee from Texas north by intolerant reactions to their interracial marriage.
Described by the Chicago Police Department as “more dangerous than a thousand rioters” in the 1920s, Parsons and her husband had become highly effective anarchist organizers primarily involved in the labor movement in the late 19th century, but also participating in revolutionary activism on behalf of political prisoners, people of color, the homeless and women.


Woaaah.
Just woaaah.


“more dangerous than a thousand rioters” fuck yeah.


Wow.

girl-bear:

shakeitupbebe:

citoyenrebelle:

I didn’t know her, therefore Wikipedia:

Lucy (or Lucia) Eldine Gonzalez was born around 1853 in Texas, likely as a slave, to parents of Native American, Black American and Mexican ancestry.[1] In 1871 she married Albert Parsons, a former Confederate soldier. They were forced to flee from Texas north by intolerant reactions to their interracial marriage.

Described by the Chicago Police Department as “more dangerous than a thousand rioters” in the 1920s, Parsons and her husband had become highly effective anarchist organizers primarily involved in the labor movement in the late 19th century, but also participating in revolutionary activism on behalf of political prisoners, people of color, the homeless and women.

Woaaah.

Just woaaah.

“more dangerous than a thousand rioters” fuck yeah.

Wow.

(Source: , via womenwhokickass)

i was gonna put a smart-sounding quote down here, but i think these fly qwoc (coming now/in the past to a screen near you) can speak for themselves

(Source: autoluminescence, via aglimpseofstocking)

eternallybeautifullyblack:

I think Viola Davis is one of the most slept on actors in the movie business. I can’t get enough of her.

Viola Davis as You’ve Never Seen Her Before: Leading Lady!
By AMY WALLACE
“Even when I get the fried-chicken special of the day, I have to dig into it like it’s filet mignon,” Viola Davis said. She was speaking not of meals, but of roles. During her 30-year career as an actress, Davis has played a crack-addicted mother (“Antwone Fisher”), the mother of an abducted child (“Prisoners”) and the mother of James Brown (“Get On Up”). Her characters often serve to “hold up the wall” of the narrative, she said, like the empathetic best friend in “Eat, Pray, Love” or the kindly stranger in “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close.” Or the kindly mental-institution psychiatrist in “It’s Kind of a Funny Story,” the kindly rape-treatment counselor in “Trust” or the kindly medium in “Beautiful Creatures.”
“I always got the phone call that said: ‘I have a great project for you. You’re going to be with, hypothetically, Vanessa Redgrave, Julianne Moore, Annette Bening,’ ” she said, sitting in the living room of her San Fernando Valley home, barefoot on the couch in a gray T-shirt and leggings, her hair wrapped under a black turban. “Then I get the script, and I have a role that lasts for a page or two.”
Yet over and over again, Davis has made these marginalized characters memorable.
[Continue reading article at The New York Times.]

eternallybeautifullyblack:

I think Viola Davis is one of the most slept on actors in the movie business. I can’t get enough of her.

Viola Davis as You’ve Never Seen Her Before: Leading Lady!

By AMY WALLACE

“Even when I get the fried-chicken special of the day, I have to dig into it like it’s filet mignon,” Viola Davis said. She was speaking not of meals, but of roles. During her 30-year career as an actress, Davis has played a crack-addicted mother (“Antwone Fisher”), the mother of an abducted child (“Prisoners”) and the mother of James Brown (“Get On Up”). Her characters often serve to “hold up the wall” of the narrative, she said, like the empathetic best friend in “Eat, Pray, Love” or the kindly stranger in “Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close.” Or the kindly mental-institution psychiatrist in “It’s Kind of a Funny Story,” the kindly rape-treatment counselor in “Trust” or the kindly medium in “Beautiful Creatures.”

“I always got the phone call that said: ‘I have a great project for you. You’re going to be with, hypothetically, Vanessa Redgrave, Julianne Moore, Annette Bening,’ ” she said, sitting in the living room of her San Fernando Valley home, barefoot on the couch in a gray T-shirt and leggings, her hair wrapped under a black turban. “Then I get the script, and I have a role that lasts for a page or two.”

Yet over and over again, Davis has made these marginalized characters memorable.

[Continue reading article at The New York Times.]

(via stopwhitewashing)

builttobulk:

onlyfitgirls:

Ha’a Keaulana runs across the ocean floor with a 50 pound boulder. They do this as training to survive the massive surf waves of winter. She learned her amazing skills from her dad, legendary waterman #briankeaulana and her Grandpa, #Buffalo. I was very humbled to learn from the Hawaiians who have salt water running through their veins. Mahalo Nui Loa. Please stay tuned for our upcoming story on the Hawaiian surfing culture. 
Shared of @natgeo  

This is just.. Super impressive.

builttobulk:

onlyfitgirls:

Ha’a Keaulana runs across the ocean floor with a 50 pound boulder. They do this as training to survive the massive surf waves of winter. She learned her amazing skills from her dad, legendary waterman #briankeaulana and her Grandpa, #Buffalo. I was very humbled to learn from the Hawaiians who have salt water running through their veins. Mahalo Nui Loa. Please stay tuned for our upcoming story on the Hawaiian surfing culture. 

Shared of @natgeo  

This is just.. Super impressive.

(via thegamingmuse)